Tag Archives: Venezuela

Do Bulls Get Angry When They See Red?


Myself 

By T.V. Antony Raj

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In the above video, was the bull infuriated by the red coloured shawl worn by the Hindu sadhu?

Incidents such as this raise the perennial question “”

We have always been told not to go near a bull while wearing a red dress, or something similar to red that would make a bull angry.  Is it true?

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A matador gets a bull's attention by waving his muleta. (Credit: Bull Fighter via Shutterstock)
A matador gets a bull’s attention by waving his muleta. (Credit: Bull Fighter via Shutterstock)

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Bullfighting (Spanish: corrida de toros or toreo; Portuguese: corrida de touros or tourada) is one of the most popular and controversial traditional spectacular sport prevailing in Spain, Portugal, parts of southern France and in some Latin American countries such as Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela and Peru.

In some areas, people classify bullfighting as a blood sport, but in other areas, it is not considered a sport but a cultural event, a spectacle and art form with no elements of competition in the proceedings.

Some claim that bullfighting is an art form wherein professional toreros (bullfighters) seek to evoke inspiration and an emotional connection with the audience while attempting to subdue and slaughter the bulls.

The most senior torero who actually kills the bull is called a matador.

The matador executes various formal moves with the muleta (a small red cape) and a sword. A snorting bull charges at the muleta waved by the matador. The angry bull appears to see the red cape and charges angrily towards it.

After hooking the bull multiple times behind the shoulder by the matador, the bullfight concludes usually with the killing of the bull by a single sword thrust, called the Estacada. In Portugal, the finale consists of a tradition called the pega a, where men (forcados) try to grab and hold the bull by its horns when it runs at them.

The use of the muleta by Spanish matadors in bullfighting began at the beginning of the 18th century. From then on the myth that “red makes bulls go wild” perpetuated.

A group of MythBusters set out to find whether bulls really hate the colour red? Test this myth they decided to put makeshift matadors into an arena, each holding a cape or muleta of a different color including a red one.

The red, blue, green, and white capes got equal, mild attacks when they were motionless. Bulls, just like other cattle, do not differentiate between red, blue, green, and white colours. Only when the matador waved the cape, the bulls lose their temper and charge aggressively. Moreover, the bulls used in bullfights are from a very aggressive breed and they’re raised in a way that any sudden movements will make these bulls angry and make them attack.

So , this old myth that “a bull charges at the sight of red” can get tossed right out of our mindset.

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Price of Diesel Around the World!


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Myself . By T.V. Antony Raj

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On  February 13, 2014, I posted  an article titled “Price of Petrol Around the World!” Some of my readers wanted to know about the price of diesel in India and in other countries around the world.

Diesel prices in India in Indian Rupees (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)
Diesel prices in India in Indian Rupees (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)

The above graph shows the price of diesel in India from September, 2012 to February, 2014 with the average value during this period was र57.89 with a minimum of र53.46 in September, 2012 and a maximum of र64.49 in June, 2013.

Diesel prices in India and other countries  (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)
Diesel prices in India and other countries (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)

Compared to the average price of diesel in the world, India is relatively cheaper. Diesel in India is 32% cheaper than the world average of र85.63. The average price of diesel around the world in February, 2014 is र82.41 per liter. Though all countries have access to the same petroleum prices of international markets, they impose various taxes on petroleum products and offer subsidies. Hence, the retail price of diesel differs substantially among countries.

As a general rule, countries that produce and export oil sell diesel to their nationals at much lower prices while rich countries charge higher prices. However, the economically advanced United States have a comparatively low price of diesel – $1.03 (र64.49) per liter.

In Venezuela, the government subsidizes gasoline and the Venezuelans pay almost nothing to drive their vehicles at $0.01 (र0.85) per liter.

Diesel prices around the world in February 2014
(Source: globalpetrolprices.com)

Country USDollars IndianRupees
     
Venezuela 0.01   0.85
Iran 0.03   1.70
Saudi Arabia 0.08   5.09
Egypt 0.16 10.18
Bahrain 0.16 10.18
Kuwait 0.19 11.88
Qatar 0.24 15.27
Yemen 0.30 18.67
Brunei 0.31 19.52
Ecuador 0.35 22.06
Oman 0.49 30.55
Bolivia 0.53 33.09
Sudan 0.54 33.94
Angola 0.54 33.94
Syria 0.57 35.64
Kazakhstan 0.65 40.73
Iraq 0.72 44.97
Malaysia 0.72 44.97
Argentina 0.86 53.46
Bangladesh 0.88 55.15
Thailand 0.91 56.85
Sri Lanka 0.91 56.85
India 0.95 59.40
Mexico 0.97 60.25
Jordan 0.97 60.25
Zimbabwe 0.98 61.09
Philippines 0.98 61.09
Nigeria 0.98 61.09
Lebanaon 0.98 61.09
Ethopia 0.99 61.94
Belarus 0.99 61.94
Kyrgyzstan 1.01 62.79
Ghana 1.01 62.79
Nepal 1.02 63.64
USA 1.03 64.49
Brazil 1.03 64.49
Vietnam 1.05 65.34
Tunisia 1.05 65.34
Guatemala 1.05 65.34
Bhutan 1.05 65.34
Indonesia 1.06 66.19
Maldives 1.06 661.9
DR Congo 1.07 67.03
Taiwan 1.09 67.88
Mozamique 1.10 68.73
Namibia 1.10 68.73
Pakistan 1.10 68.73
Morocco 1.13 70.43
South Africa 1.14 71.28
Ukraine 1.14 71.28
Russia 1.16 72.13
Jamaica 1.16 72.13
Tajikistan 1.17 72.97
Sierra Leone 1.20 74.67
Costa Rica 1.20 74.67
Colombia 1.21 75.52
Guinea 1.21 75.52
Peru 1.21 75.52
Liberia 1.22 76.37
Kenya 1.22 76.37
Gorgia 1.22 76.37
Chile 1.22 76.37
New Zealand 1.22 76.37
Botswana 1.24 77.22
Laos 1.24 77.22
Uganda 1.24 77.22
Cambodia 1.25 78.07
Armenia 1.27 78.91
Tanzania 1.27 78.91
Burkina Faso 1.27 78.91
Mauritania 1.27 78.91
Moldova 1.28 79.76
Ivory Coast 1.28 79.76
China 1.28 79.76
Canada 1.28 79.76
Paraguay 1.29 80.61
Domi. Rep. 1.32 82.31
Japan 1.33 83.16
Fiji 1.33 83.16
Mongolia 1.33 83.16
Singapore 1.35 84.00
Djibouti 1.37 85.70
Lesotho 1.37 85.70
Swaziland 1.40 87.40
Cameroon 1.40 87.40
Mauritius 1.41 88.25
Australia 1.43 89.10
Cape Verde 1.47 91.64
Niger 1.48 92.49
Togo 1.50 93.34
Rwanda 1.52 95.04
Macedonia 1.52 95.04
Benin 1.55 96.73
An dorra 1.56 97.58
South Korea 1.58 98.43
Mali 1.61 100.13
Madagascar 1.62 100.98
Hong Kong 1.62 100.98
R. of Congo 1.62 100.98
Luxembourg 1.63 101.82
Zambia 1.65 102.67
Senegal 1.65 102.67
Chad 1.67 104.37
Bosnia and Herz 1.70 106.07
Croatia 1.71 106.92
Poland 1.73 107.76
Larvia 1.73 107.76
Lithuania 1.73 107.76
Montenegro 1.75 109.46
Albania 1.77 110.31
Romania 1.80 112.01
France 1.80 112.01
Estonia 1.80 112.01
Austria 1.80 112.01
Czech Rep. 1.81 112.86
Hungary 1.82 113.70
Uruguay 1.82 113.70
Malawi 1.82 113.70
Burundi 1.82 113.70
Serbia 1.84 114.55
Spain 1.85 115.40
Bulgaria 1.85 115.40
Malta 1.85 115.40
Slovenia 1.85 115.40
Greece 1.86 116.25
Slovakia 1.86 116.25
Portugal 1.92 119.64
Germany 1.95 121.34
Cyprus 1.97 123.04
Belgium 1.97 123.04
Irelan 2.01 125.58
Switzerland 2.04 127.28
Netherlands 2.04 127.28
Turkey 2.07 128.98
Finland 2.08 129.83
Sweden 2.09 130.67
Denmark 2.11 131.53
Iceland 2.12 132.37
Israel 2.16 134.92
C.A. Republic 2.16 134.92
UK 2.26 140.86
Italy 2.29 142.55
Norway 2.67 166.31

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Price of Petrol Around the World!


. Myself . By T.V. Antony Raj

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Price of Petrol around the world (Posted in Facebook)
Price of Petrol around the world (Posted in Facebook)

I came across the above picture posted on Facebook. Any rational thinker would surely realize that the aim of the person who originally posted this rubbish was to mislead gullible Indians and malign the powers that currently rule the country.

A few Indians have the false notion that whatever appears in the social media or get printed in the traditional media such as newspapers and magazines is the gospel truth, and to keep up with the Joneses they just copy it on their social media pages without delving into the truth. Do you think these prices are correct? The person who prepared  this falsehood needs some coaching in basic arithmetic. Just look at this: Petrol Price around the world - Arithmetiic

11.80 + 9.75 + 4 + 8 = 33.55%

and

33.55% of र16.5 is र5.5275

so,,

र16.5 + र5.5275 = र22.0275

How did this person arrive at the figure of र50.05? Did he leave out any tax or other levies?

Petrol prices in India (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)
Petrol prices in India in Indian Rupees (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)

The above graph shows the price of petrol in India from September, 2012 to February, 2014 with the average value during this period was र80.75 with a minimum of र73.82 in November, 2013 and a maximum of र89.94 in September, 2012.

Petrol prices in India and other countries  (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)
Petrol prices in India and other countries (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)

Compared to the average price of petrol in the world, India is relatively cheaper. Petrol in India is 15% cheaper than the world average of र95.18. The average price of petrol around the world in February, 2014 is र90. 67 per liter. Though all countries have access to the same petroleum prices of international markets, they impose various taxes on petroleum products and offer subsidies. Hence, the retail price of petrol differs substantially among countries.

As a general rule, countries that produce and export oil sell petrol to their nationals at much lower prices while rich countries charge higher prices. However, the economically advanced United States have a comparatively low price of gasoline – $0.88 (र55. 15) per liter.

In Venezuela, the government subsidizes gasoline and the Venezuelans pay almost nothing to drive their cars at $0.03 (र1.70) per liter.

Gasoline Prices around the world in February 2014 (Source: globalpetrolprices.com)

Country

US

Dollars

Indian Rupees

 

 

 

Venezuela

0.03

   1.70

Iran

0.12

  7.64

Saudi Arabia

0.20

12.73

Kuwait

0.23

14.43

Qatar

0.24

15.27

Bahrain

0.27

16.97

Oman

0.39

24.61

Egypt

0.39

24.61

Yemen

0.45

28.00

Brunei

0.50

31.40

Bolivia

0.53

33.09

Ecuador

0.68

42.43

Kazakhstan

0.72

44.97

Sudan

0.79

49.21

Angola

0.83

51.76

Malaysia

0.87

54.31

USA

0.88

55.15

Indonesia

0.92

57.70

Mexico

0.94

58.55

Belarus

0.98

61.09

Ghana

0.98

61.09

Iraq

0.99

61.94

Argentina

0.99

61.94

Pakistan

1.06

66.19

Zimbabwe

1.07

67.03

Maldives

1.07

67.03

Jamaica

1.07

67.03

Namibia

1.07

67.03

Kyrgyzstan

1.09

67.88

Georgia

1.13

70.43

Guatemala

1.14

71.28

Canada

1.14

71.28

Russia

1.14

71.28

Taiwan

1.17

72.97

Ethiopia

1.17

72.97

Botswana

1.18

73.82

Sierra Leone

1.20

74.67

Tunisia

1.20

74.67

Guinea

1.21

75.52

South Africa

1.21

75.52

Vietnam

1.21

75.52

Brazil

1.22

76.37

Syria

1.22

76.37

Philippines

1.22

76.37

Lesotho

1.24

77.22

Bhutan

1.24

77.22

India

1.25

78.07

Liberia

1.25

78.07

Bangladesh

1.25

78.07

Ukraine

1.27

78.91

Sri Lanka

1,28

79.76

Tanzania

1.28

79.76

Kenya

1.29

80.61

Costa Rica

1.29

80.61

Nepal

1.29

80.61

Tajikistan

1.31

81.46

Moldova

1.32

82.31

Benin

1.33

83.16

Australia

1.36

84.85

China

1.37

85.70

Swaziland

1.37

85.70

Uganda

1.37

85.70

Nigeria

1.37

85.70

Niger

1.37

85.70

Armenia

1.39

86.55

Mozambique

1.41

88.25

Jordan

1.41

88.25

Mongolia

1.41

88.25

Domin. Rep.

1.44

89.94

Lebanon

1.44

89.94

Fiji

1.47

91.64

Thailand

1.47

91.64

Cambodia

1.47

91.64

Mauritania

1.48

92.49

Peru

1.51

94.19

Togo

1.51

94.19

Burkina Faso

1.52

95.04

Rwanda

1.52

95.04

Japan

1.52

95.04

Cameroon

1.54

95.88

Chile

1.55

96.73

Morocco

1.58

98.43

Ivory Coast

1.59

99.28

DR Congo

1.62

100.98

Laos

1.62

100.98

R. of Congo

1.63

101.82

Paraguay

1.63

101.82

Bosnia and Herz.

1.66

103.52

Cape Verde

1.67

104.37

Mauritius

1.67

104.37

Chad

1.69

105.22

Poland

1.70

106.07

Andorra

1.70

106.07

Romania

1.73

107.76

Macedonia

1.73

107.76

Singapore

1.74

108.61

Hungary

1.74

108.61

Latvia

1.74

108.61

Estonia

1.74

108.61

Luxembourg

1.75

109.46

South Korea

1.75

109.46

Lithuania

1.77

110.31

Zambia

1.77

110.31

Bulgaria

1.77

110.31

Albania

1.78

111.16

Czech Rep.

1.78

112.01

Malawi

1.80

112.01

Croatia

1.80

112.01

Colombia

1.81

112.86

Serbia

1.81

112.86

Mali

1.82

113.70

Burundi

1.82

113.70

New Zealand

1.82

113.70

Austria

1.84

114.55

Senegal

1.85

115.40

Montenegro

1.86

116.25

Switzerland

1.89

117.95

Spain

1.90

118.79

Cyprus

1.90

118.79

Uruguay

1.92

119.64

Madagascar

1.95

121.34

Slovenia

1.95

121.34

Slovakia

1.96

122.19

Malta

1.96

122.19

France

2.04

127.28

Djibouti

2.08

129.83

Sweden

2.08

129.83

Ireland

2.08

129.83

Iceland

2.12

132.37

UK

2.14

133.22

Hong Kong

2.16

134.92

Germany

2.16

134.92

Israel

2.16

134.92

Belgium

2.18

135.77

Portugal

2.18

135.77

C.A. Republic

2.19

136.61

Finland

2.20

137.46

Greece

2.26

140.86

Turkey

2.26

140.86

Denmark

2.30

143.40

Netherlands

2.39

149.34

Italy

2.41

150.19

Norway

2.86

178.19

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“Value Has a Value Only If Its Value Is Valued” – Brian G. Dyson


Myself . 

By T. V. Antony Raj

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Mr Brian G. Dyson joined The Coca-Cola Company in Venezuela in 1959. He served the Company for 35 years up to his retirement in 1984. He worked for many years in South America, the Caribbean islands and Mexico; and held various executive-level positions in the Company.

Brian G. Dyson – Former CEO of Coca-Cola
Brian G. Dyson – Former CEO of Coca-Cola

In 1978, Coca-Cola USA, the Company’s US soft drink division appointed him as their President.

In 1983, Mr Dyson, named President of Coca-Cola North America, took on the responsibility for Coca-Cola Company’s entire North American business; and in 1986, the mantle of president and Chief Executive Officer of Coca-Cola Enterprises fell on him.

Though he retired from the Coca-Cola Company in 1994, he remained active as a consultant to the Company.

On September 6, 1996, Mr Dyson gave the following succinct speech at the Georgia Tech 172nd Commencement Address.

“Imagine life as a game in which you are juggling some five balls in the air. You name them – Work, Family, Health, Friends and Spirit and you’re keeping all of these in the air.

You will soon understand that work is a rubber ball. If you drop it, it will bounce back. But the other four balls – Family, Health, Friends and Spirit – are made of glass. If you drop one of these; they will be irrevocably scuffed, marked, nicked, damaged or even shattered. They will never be the same. You must understand that and strive for it.

Work efficiently during office hours and leave on time. Give the required time to your family, friends and have proper rest. Value has a value only if its value is valued.”

In August 2001, Mr Dyson came out of retirement. He accepted the position of Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer of The Coca-Cola Company.

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