Tag Archives: Parents

Taking Care of an Aging Parent


Myself 

By T. V. Antony Raj

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A young man lived with his wife, his four-year-old son and his frail elderly father – a widower with blurry eyes,  trembling hands, and faltering steps.

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The family would eat together at the dining table. The elderly person’s shaky hands and failing sight made eating rather difficult for him. Often, food fell off his spoon and dropped on the floor, and as he clutched his glass of milk with unsteady hands, milk spilled on the tablecloth and his lap.

The daughter-in-law irritated with the mess he created bawled out. “I have had enough of his spilling food and milk on the table and the floor. You must do something about your father,” she told her husband.

So, the son set a small table at the corner of the dining room. Since the elderly man had broken a number of ceramic dishes, the daughter-in-law served his food in wooden bowls.

The four-year-old boy watched his grandfather eat alone silently at the little table while he and his parents ate at the grand dining table. Sometimes he saw tears rolling down his grandfather’s cheeks whenever his parents admonished him for dropping his spoon, spilling food, milk, or water.

One evening, before supper, the father noticed his little son playing with wood scraps and strings.

“What are you making, son?” he asked.

“Oh, Dad, I’m making two little wooden bowls,” the boy replied.

“Bowls?”

“Yes.”

“What for?”

“For you and mama to eat your food from when I grow up.”

The boy’s parents were speechless.

The four-year-old smiled sweetly at his parents and went back to work. He did not see the tears that streamed down their cheeks.

That evening, the boy smiled as his father and mother led the venerable parent back to the grand dining table.

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To All Sleep-deprived Parents… O You Terror!


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Myself 

By T.V. Antony Raj

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O You Terror! (Source: gettyimages)
O You Terror! (Source: gettyimages)

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Carmina Burana means “Songs from Beuern” in Latin. It is the name given to a manuscript of 254 poems and dramatic texts from 11th to 13th century. “Beuern” is short for Benediktbeuern. The collection found in 1803 in the Benedictine monastery of Benediktbeuern, is now housed in the Bavarian State Library in Munich.

These pieces are in most cases bawdy, irreverent, and satirical. Written by students and clergy, in Medieval Latin, a few are in Middle High German, and some with traces of Old French or Provençal.

Twenty-four poems in Carmina Burana were set to music by Carl Orff in 1936 and his composition quickly became popular and a staple piece of the classical music repertoire. Scores of film soundtracks including Lord of the Rings have used the opening and closing movement, “O Fortuna”.

The Sydney Symphony Orchestra launched its “Say it with Carmina” contest inviting Australians to come up with new lyrics.

Matthew Hodge is a father of three living in Sydney, Australia. He sent his entry an “An Ode to Sleep Deprived Parents and Terrorizing Toddlers” to the contest. Among the many entries submitted, including odes to the Pope, it was Hodge’s entry with its hilarious phrases such as, “Oh you terror, get down from there. Mummy’s getting cranky,” that received the most votes. He won the first prize.

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The Sydney Symphony Orchestra.
The Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

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The 200 members of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra somberly chanted phrases like “Where are your pants? What have you done with my purse?” with a straight face making Hodge’s words funnier.

Even if this musical offering from the Sydney Symphony Orchestra won’t make your chores and stress go away, it is sure to bring a smile on your face.

THE ODE TO SLEEP DEPRIVED PARENTS AND TERRORISING TODDLERS

O’ you terror!
Get down from there!
Mummy’s getting cranky…

Put my phone down.
Where are your pants?
What have you done with my purse?
Don’t throw those blocks.
What is that smell?
Why do you look so happy?
What’s in your mouth?
Who ripped that book?
Why won’t you just stop moving?

He’s on the chair!
Just standing there!
Wobbling like a drunk man.
Where is my mug?
What was that crash?
Who let you in the kitchen?
You’ve got a knife!
Put it down now!
Don’t wave it near your sister!

Put my phone down.
Where are my apps?
Who dialled triple zero?

Why won’t you sleep?
Is it your teeth?
I need another coffee!
My head’s so sore!
Look at the floor!
Cleaning will take forever.

What’s wrong with you?
What did I do?
Why do you do this to me?
I hope when you…
Have some kids too…
They drive you crazy!

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An Aged Mother’s Plea…


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Myself 

By T.V. Antony Raj

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An aged mother crying

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My Dearest Child,

May the almighty grant you patience to listen to what I am about to say.

Please understand that elderly people are a bit too sensitive.

I am sorry dear. Your dad and I are getting old. Age is creeping on us and our hands shake. So, I beg you not to yell at us if we drop the plate, spill coffee, tea or soup on the sofa, table or floor.

Since your father’s hearing is getting worse day by day, he can’t hear what you are saying. So, please don’t hurt his feelings by calling him “Deaf! ….”; instead please repeat patiently what you said or write it down.

In time to come we might wet our clothes, the bed or the sofa. Don’t scold us then.

When our knees get weaker, I pray you have the patience to help us get up from the chair or bed. I don’t think you can remember us helping you while you were learning to walk as a toddler.

We know you are busy with your work and your family. So, if you do have some spare time, can you talk to us just for a few minutes – in person or over the phone?

At times when your father or I keep repeating ourselves like a scratched gramophone record please bear with us. Please don’t make fun of us, or say that you are “getting sick of listening to” us. When you were little, we enjoyed hearing you repeat words and we encouraged you to do so and as we encourage your son to do so now.

Even if you’re not interested in our “repeating the same old stories,” please pretend that you enjoy listening to our rambling like we used to listen to your babbling when you were young?

Your father and I know that we are not going to last much longer, and we pray to God to grant you patience to take care of us during the last few moments of our life.

At the time of our death, will you please hold our hand to give us the strength to face death peacefully?

When we are dead don’t spend money and your precious time by burying us in a cemetery; instead donate our mortal bodies to a medical college where the students may profit by dissecting them.

After we die, when we finally meet our creator, we will whisper in His ear to bless you and your family because you loved your mother and father till their death.

Thank you so much for your care.

You’ll understand what I am saying now when you yourself get older.Never, ever forget that your father and I loved you and your family and will always love you all, forever and ever, from the “Bosom of Abraham“.

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Caring for Aging Parents


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Myself By T.V. Antony Raj

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A frail old widower, lived with his son, his daughter-in-law, and his four-year-old grandson. His eyes were blurry, his hands trembled, and his step faltered.

.

The family would eat together at the dinner table. But the elderly person’s shaky hands and failing sight made eating rather difficult for him. Food fell off his spoon, dropping on the floor. When he grasped his glass the milk often spilled on the tablecloth and his lap.

The son and the daughter-in-law became irritated with the mess he created.

“We must do something about my father,” said the son.

“I have had enough of his spilling food and milk on the table and the floor,” the daughter-in-law said.

So, the couple set a small table at the corner of the dining room. There the old man ate alone while the rest of the family enjoyed their dinner at the dinner table. Since the old man had broken a number of ceramic dishes, his food was served in wooden bowls.

The four-year-old boy watched it all in silence. Sometimes the grandson saw, tears rolling down his grandfather’s cheeks as he ate alone.

Still, the only words the couple had for the old man were sharp admonitions when he dropped a spoon or spilled food.

One evening, before supper, the father noticed his little son playing with wood scraps and strings.

He asked, “What are you making, son?”

The boy replied, “Oh, I’m making two little wooden bowls.”

“Bowls?”

The little boy replied, “Yes. Bowls for you and mama to eat your food from when I grow up.”

The boy’s parents were speechless.

The four-year-old smiled sweetly at them and went back to work.

Tears streamed down their cheeks. Though no words were spoken, both knew what must be done.

That evening, the son and daughter-in-law gently led the old man back to the family table while the grandson smiled.

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Source: Advice on Caring for Aging Parents

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