Tag Archives: Ireland

A Plethora of Refugees in Europe


Myself

By T.V. Antony Raj.

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Europe has a population of 740 million of which 500 million are in the European Union (EU). According to the European Union border agency the plethora of refugees entering Europe had increased over the past 10 months. More than 150,000 refugees entered the EU in August 2015 increasing the total influx of refugees to more than half a million for the year 2015.

Although this amount of refugees is not large enough to construe it as an invasion or being over-run when compared to the population of Europe, the European leaders were slow to respond. Dimitris Avramopoulos, the EU migration commissioner has called it “the worst refugee crisis facing Europe since World War II.

 

Europes refugee crisis (Source: uk.businessinsider.com)
Europes refugee crisis (Source: uk.businessinsider.com)

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For many refugees fleeing the Syrian civil war and the abominable ISIS, the Greek islands have been the gateway to enter the European Union.  This year alone, more than 259,000 refugees entered Greece by boat via Turkey. The arrival of about 88,000 refugees in the Greek islands in August 2015 was the largest so far, an eleven-fold increase compared to the same month a year ago.  Almost 75% percent of the refugees seeking asylum were Syrians.

The Schengen Area

Six founding members: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and West Germany created the European Economic Community (EEC) by the Treaty of Rome in 1957. This regional organization aimed to bring about economic integration between its member states, including a common market and customs union.

When the ten member states of the then EEC were not able to reach a consensus on the abolition of border controls, five of its members signed The Schengen Agreement on June 14, 1985, paving the way to the creation of Europe’s borderless Schengen Area. The treaty signed near the town of Schengen in Luxembourg was not implemented in full until 1995.

The Schengen Agreement proposed the gradual abolition of border checks and allow vehicles to cross the common borders of the signatories of the treaty without stopping. It permitted residents in the border areas to cross the borders away from fixed checkpoints.

In 1990, the Schengen Convention supplemented the Schengen Agreement by proposing the abolition of internal border controls and a common visa policy. For most purposes, the Schengen Area with a common visa policy functions as a single country for international travel purposes. The Schengen Agreement and the rules adopted under it were quite separate from the EU structures.

Map of Schengen Area (Source: wikipedia.org)
Map of Schengen Area (Source: wikipedia.org)

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The Schengen Area now comprises 26 European countries. These member states have strengthened their external border controls with non-Schengen states. Out of the current 28 European Union member states, 22 are participants in the Schengen Area.

Countries comprising The Schengen Area
State Area (km²) Population
Austria 83,871 8,414,638
Belgium 30,528 11,007,020
Czech Republic 78,866 10,535,811
Denmark (excluding Greenland
and the Faroe Islands)
43,094 5,564,219
Estonia 45,338 1,340,194
Finland (Including Åland Islands) 338,145 5,391,700
France (mainland and Corsica only) 551,695 63,929,000
Germany 357,050 81,799,600
Greece 131,990 10,815,197
Hungary 93,030 9,979,000
Iceland 103,000 318,452
Italy 301,318 60,681,514
Latvia 64,589 2,245,357
Liechtenstein 160 36,010
Lithuania 65,300 3,207,060
Luxembourg 2,586 511,840
Malta 316 417,608
Netherlands (excluding Aruba,
Curaçao,  Sint Maarten
and the Caribbean Netherlands)

41,526

16,703,700

Norway (excluding Svalbard) 385,155 5,063,709
Poland 312,683 38,186,860
Portugal (Including Madeira and Azores) 92,391 10,647,763
Slovakia 49,037 5,440,078
Slovenia 20,273 2,048,951
Spain (with special provisions for
Ceuta and Melilla)
506,030 46,030,109
Sweden 449,964 9,415,570
 Switzerland 41,285 7,866,500
Schengen Area 4,189,111 417,597,460

Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Currently, the Schengen Area has an area of 1,617,4245 square miles (4,189,111 square kilometers) and a population of over 400 million people.

Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania are four of the six EU members that do not form part of the Schengen Area, are legally obliged and wish to join the Area. The other two, the United Kingdom, and Ireland, maintain opt-outs.

Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland have signed the Schengen Agreement even though they are member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and are not in the EU.

The three European microstates, the Vatican, Monaco, and San Marino do not have border controls with the Schengen countries that surround them. Though considered as de facto within the Schengen Area they have not officially signed documents that make them part of the Schengen Area.

The influx of refugees

 

Since many Eastern European countries are guarding their borders in the face of the influx of refugees, the distribution of refugees among the 28-member EU is somewhat skewed. According to the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), EU countries received more than 437,000 asylum applications from January 2015 to July 2015. Germany received the most applications, followed by Hungary, Sweden, Italy and France.

The migrants from African countries enter the EU through Italy and Spain. Many of those who enter Italy apply for asylum on landing there. Some try to cross into France.

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A group of migrants gathering near a line of trucks on the motorway that leads to the Channel Tunnel terminal in Calais, northern France. (Source: uk.businessinsider.com)
A group of migrants gathering near a line of trucks on the motorway that leads to the Channel Tunnel terminal in Calais, northern France. (Source: uk.businessinsider.com)

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From France, a few try to enter the United Kingdom by perilous means such as getting smuggled in containers through the Eurotunnel from Calais, northern France.

Many Syrians try to reach Italy from Greece while others head to Austria via Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Slovenia.

Most refugees try to reach the Schengen Area. From there, they move into Hungary through Macedonia and Serbia. Also, some refugees from Turkey reach Hungary via Bulgaria and Romania. The popular route to enter the Schengen zone is through Norway, by way of Russia and Lebanon.

From Hungary, most refugees continue their journey to richer countries such as Germany and Sweden that have liberal immigration policies.

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All Saints’ Day, All Souls’ Day, and The Celtic Festival of Samhain


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Myself 

By T.V. Antony Raj

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All Saints

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All Saints’ Day, to honour the saints, falls on November 1, and the All Souls’ Day, the day to pray for the recently departed kith and kin, falls on November 2.

The word “Halloween” was first used by the Scottish around 1556 AD, as a variant of “All Hallows’ Even,” to mean the night before All Hallows’ Day or All Saints’ Day.

The Celtic Festival of Samhain

Yours is the day, yours also the night; you established the luminaries and the sun. You have fixed all the bounds of the earth; you made summer and winter. (Psalm 74:16-17)

Even though the word Halloween has its origin from Christianity, according to some scholars it owes its origin to the pagan harvest festivals such as the Roman feast of Pomona, the goddess of fruits and seeds, or to Parentalia, the festival of the dead or to the Celtic festival of Samhain, the Old Irish word for “summer’s end”.

The Gaelic festival of Samhain marks the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the “darker half” of the year. It is celebrated from sunset of October 31 to sunset of November 1, halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice.

In some Gaelic languages, Samhain is the word for November.

All Saints Day, introduced in the year 609 AD, was originally celebrated on May 13. In 1835, at the behest of Pope Gregory IV, it was changed to November 1, the same date as Samhain. Some suggest the change was due to Celtic influence in Christianity while others suggest it as a Germanic idea.

Some early Irish literature mention that many important events in their mythology happened on Samhain. The festival of Samhain observed in Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Asturias and Galicia. Samhain, along with Imbolc, Beltane and Lughnasadh make up the four Gaelic seasonal festivals. The Gaelic (Irish, Scottish and Manx) also held kindred festivals at the same time of the year such as Brythonic Calan Gaeaf (in Wales), Kalan Gwav (in Cornwall) and Kalan Goañv (in Brittany).

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Samhain Ritual
Samhain Ritual

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During Samhain, the Gaelic took stock, readied for the cold winter ahead, brought the cattle back down from the summer pastures, slaughtered livestock, lit bonfires, enacted rituals along with divination games. As a cleansing ritual, they would walk with their livestock between two bonfires, cast the bones of slaughtered livestock into its flames.

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All Souls' Day night vigil
All Souls’ Day night vigil

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The Gaelic believed, that during Samhain, the door to the Otherworlds or realms of supernatural beings and the dead, opened just enough for the souls of the dead and other weird entities, to enter our world. They beckoned souls of the dead kin to attend the feast by setting a place at the table for them. It has thus been likened to a festival of the dead. Lewis Spence in his book “The Magic Arts in Celtic Britain” described it as a “feast of the dead” and “festival of the fairies.”

Divination also took place during Samhain. The tradition says that in places like Asturias, “Güestia,” a group of spirits from the world of the dead, go out that night, walking in the forests and on roads. People drew circles on the floor and remained within those circles until the spirits passed them.

 

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The Traditions of Halloween


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Myself 

By T.V. Antony Raj

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On October 31, the Eve of the Christian feast of All Hallows’ (or All Saints’) Day, most people in Europe, the Americas, Australia, and a few in Asia and Africa celebrate “All Hallows’ Evening.” This celebration is also known as Halloween or Hallowe’en or Hallowmas.

All Saints’ Day, to honour the saints, falls on November 1, and the All Souls’ Day, the day to pray for the recently departed kith and kin, falls on November 2.

The word “Halloween” was first used by the Scottish around 1556 AD, as a variant of “All Hallows’ Even,” to mean the night before All Hallows’ Day or All Saints’ Day.

The Tradition of Guising

The Gaels or Goidels speak one of the Gaelic Celtic languages: Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx. Goidelic speech originated in Ireland and later spread to neighbouring regions. Celtic languages are most commonly spoken on the north-western edge of Europe, notably in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, and Cape Breton Island.

The Gaelic festival of Samhain marks the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the “darker half” of the year. It is celebrated from sunset of October 31 to sunset of November 1.

The ancient Gaelic believed that during Samhain, the door to the nether worlds and realms of supernatural beings and the dead, opened just enough for the souls of the dead and other weird entities, to enter our world; so, they protected themselves from harmful spirits and fairies active in Samhain by taking various steps to allay or ward-off the harmful entities. One such act was the custom of Guising that influenced today’s Halloween costumes.

Were wolves and a skeleton
Were wolves and a skeleton (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)
Little Red Devil (Photo: Subas Raj)
My grandson Rohan, the Little Red Devil in 2011 (Photo: V.A. Subas Raj)
My grandson Rohan dressed as Peter Pan in 2012 (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)
My grandson Rohan ‘guising‘ as Peter Pan in 2012 (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)
My grandson Rohan, the Little Pirate in 2013 (Photo: Ligia Fernando)
My grandson Rohan, the Little Pirate in 2013 (Photo: Ligia Fernando)

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In Scotland and Ireland, during Halloween, children go from a house to house, dressed up in various costumes. They receive gifts in the form of food, coins or apples or nuts and recently chocolates.

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A Witch, Maid, Imps, and a Skeleton
A Witch, a Maid, Astronauts, and a Skeleton (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

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The earliest record of Guising at Halloween comes from Scotland. In 1895, masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made by scooping out turnips, visited homes and were rewarded with cakes, fruit and money. It predates trick or treat.

The Tradition of Trick-or-Treating

In Scotland and Ireland, the people in the households expect the children who come to their houses to perform before they receive treats. The children sing or recite a joke or a funny poem which they had memorized before setting out. Some talented children may do card tricks, play the mouth organ, or do something impressive. Often the children get a treat, even if they did not perform.

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IMG_4338
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

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While going from door-to-door in disguise, it has now become common for the children to pose the question: “Trick or treat?” The “trick” in this question happens to be an idle threat to perpetrate mischief on the homeowners or their property if they do not get the treat.

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Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

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The earliest known use in print of the term “trick or treat” appears in 1927, in the article “‘Trick or Treat’ Is Demand,” Herald (Lethbridge, Alberta), November 4, 1927, p. 5, dateline Blackie, Alberta, Nov. 3.

Hallowe’en provided an opportunity for real strenuous fun. No real damage was done except to the temper of some who had to hunt for wagon wheels, gates, wagons, barrels, etc., much of which decorated the front street. The youthful tormentors were at the back door and front demanding edible plunder by the word “trick or treat” to which the inmates gladly responded and sent the robbers away rejoicing.

The Tradition of Souling

Soul cakes
Soul cakes

.

The tradition of going from door to door to receive food already existed in Great Britain and Ireland in the form of “souling”. The soulers, mainly consisting of children and the poor, would go from door to door on Halloween singing and saying prayers for the dead in return for small round soul cakes, simply called souls, traditionally made for All Saints Day or All Souls’ Day to celebrate the dead. Each cake eaten represented a soul freed from Purgatory. The practice of giving and eating soul cakes perhaps might be the origin of modern trick-or-treating.

The Tradition of Making Jack-o’-lanterns

The tradition of making lanterns during Halloween may have sprung from Samhain and Celtic beliefs. In the 19th century in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands people made turnip lanterns sometimes with faces carved into them during Samhain. The lanterns may serve three ways: to light one’s way while outside on Samhain night, to represent the spirits and otherworldly beings and entities, to protect oneself and one’s home from them.

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Traditional Irish Jack-o’-Lantern Modern carving of a Cornish Jack-o’-Lantern made from a turnip. Jack-o’-lantern lit from within by a candle.

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Jack-o’-lanterns derived their names from the phenomenon of strange light flickering over peat bogs, called ignis fatuus or jack-o’-lantern.

A modern jack-o’-lantern is typically a carved pumpkin. After cutting the top of the pumpkin, the flesh inside is scooped out. An image, usually a monstrous face, is carved out, and the lid replaced.

And as a passing thought I give you this Pumpkin Bowl: A cool, creative Halloween idea to hold your liquor. Thanks to Ms. Sheila Ribeiro, a mutual friend who posted this on Facebook.

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A Pumpkin Bowl: A cool, creative Halloween idea to hold your liquor (Source: http://www.freshomedecor.com)
Pumpkin Bowl: A cool, creative Halloween idea to hold your liquor (Source: http://www.freshomedecor.com)

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The Tradition of “All Hallows’ Even,” or Halloween Day


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Myself 

By T.V. Antony Raj

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Trick or Treating
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

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Every year, people in western countries celebrate “All Hallows’ Evening,” contracted to Halloween or Hallowe’en, on October 31st, the Eve of the Christian feast of All Hallows (or All Saints) Day. The word Halloween first used in the 16th century around 1556 represents a Scottish variant of the fuller “All Hallows’ Even,” meaning the night before All Hallows’ Day or All Saints Day that falls on November 1 and All Souls’ Day on November 2, the time for honoring the saints and praying for the recently departed.

According to many scholars, western European harvest festivals and festivals of the dead with possible pagan roots, particularly the Celtic Samhain originally influenced the celebration of Halloween.

The Celtic Festival of Samhain

The medieval Gaelic celebrated Samhain, the most important of the four quarter days marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the darker half of the year on October 31 or November 1 or halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice.

All Saints Day, introduced in the year 609 A.D. and originally celebrated on May 13, switched in 835 A.D. to November 1, the same date as Samhain, at the behest of Pope Gregory IV, as some suggest due to Celtic influence while others suggest it as a Germanic idea.

Even though the word Halloween has its origin from Christianity, some scholars think it owes its origin to the pagan Roman feast of Pomona, the goddess of fruits and seeds, or to Parentalia, the festival of the dead or to the Celtic festival of Samhain, the Old Irish word for “summer’s end”.

Some early Irish literatures mention that many important events in their mythology happened on Samhain. The festival of Samhain observed in Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Asturias, and Galicia. Along with Imbolc, Beltane and Lughnasadh make up the four Gaelic seasonal festivals. The Gaelic (Irish, Scottish, and Manx) also held kindred festivals at the same time of the year such as Brythonic Calan Gaeaf (in Wales), Kalan Gwav (in Cornwall) and Kalan Goañv (in Brittany).

During Samhain, the Gaelic took stock, prepared for the cold winter ahead, brought the cattle back down from the summer pastures, slaughtered livestock, lit bonfires, enacted rituals along with divination games. As a cleansing ritual, they would walk with their livestock between two bonfires, cast the bones of slaughtered livestock into its flames.

The Gaelic believed, that during Samhain, the door to the Otherworlds or realms of supernatural beings and the dead, opened just enough for the souls of the dead and other weird entities, to enter our world. They beckoned souls of the dead kin to attend the feast by setting a place at the table for them. It has thus been likened to a festival of the dead. Lewis Spence in his book “The Magic Arts in Celtic Britain” described it as a “feast of the dead” and “festival of the fairies.”

Divination also took place during Samhain. The tradition says that in places like Asturias, “Güestia”, a group of spirits from the world of the dead, go out that night, walking in the forests and on roads. People drew circles on the floor and remained within those circles until the spirits passed them.

The Tradition of Guising

Were wolves and a skeleton
Were wolves and a skeleton (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

.

The Gaelic protected themselves from harmful spirits and fairies thought to be active in Samhain by taking various steps to allay or ward-off the harmful spirits and fairies, and one of them is the custom of Guising, that influenced today’s Halloween customs.

In Scotland and Ireland, during Halloween children go from a house to house, dressed up in various costumes. They receive gifts in the form of food, coins or apples or nuts and recently chocolates.

A Witch, Maid, Imps, and a Skeleton
A Witch, a Maid, Imps, and a Skeleton (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

.

The earliest record of Guising at Halloween comes from Scotland. In 1895, masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made by scooping out turnips visited homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruits, and money. It predates trick or treat,

Trick-or-Treating

Trick or Treating
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

.

In Scotland and Ireland, the people in the households expect the children who come to their houses to perform before they receive treats. The children sing or recite a joke or a funny poem which they had memorized before setting out. Some talented children may do card tricks, play the mouth organ, or do something impressive. Often the children get a treat, even if they did not perform.

While going from door-to-door in disguise, it has now become common for the children to pose the question: “Trick or treat?” The “trick” in this question happens to be an idle threat to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if they do not get the treat.

.

Trick or Treating
Trick or Treating (Photo: T.V. Antony Raj)

.

The earliest known use in print of the term “trick or treat” appears in 1927, in the article “‘Trick or Treat’ Is Demand,” Herald (Lethbridge, Alberta), November 4, 1927, p. 5, dateline Blackie, Alberta, Nov. 3.

Hallowe’en provided an opportunity for real strenuous fun. No real damage was done except to the temper of some who had to hunt for wagon wheels, gates, wagons, barrels, etc., much of which decorated the front street. The youthful tormentors were at the back door and front demanding edible plunder by the word “trick or treat” to which the inmates gladly responded and sent the robbers away rejoicing.

The Tradition of Souling

The tradition of going from door to door to receive food already existed in Great Britain and Ireland in the form of “souling”. The soulers, mainly consisting of children and the poor, would go from door to door on Halloween singing and saying prayers for the dead in return for small round soul cakes, simply called souls, traditionally made for All Saints Day or All Souls’ Day to celebrate the dead. Each cake eaten represented a soul freed from Purgatory. The practice of giving and eating soul cakes perhaps might be the origin of modern trick-or-treating.

Soul cakes
Soul cakes

.

The Tradition of Making Jack-o’-lanterns

The tradition of making lanterns during Halloween may have sprung from Samhain and Celtic beliefs. In the 19th century in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands people made turnip lanterns sometimes with faces carved into them during Samhain. The lanterns may serve three ways: to light one’s way while outside on Samhain night, to represent the spirits and otherworldly beings and entities, to protect oneself and one’s home from them.

Traditional Irish Jack-o’-Lantern Modern carving of a Cornish Jack-o’-Lantern made from a turnip. Jack-o’-lantern lit from within by a candle.

Jack-o’-lanterns derived their names from the phenomenon of strange light flickering over peat bogs, called ignis fatuus or jack-o’-lantern.

A modern jack-o’-lantern is typically a carved pumpkin. After cutting the top of the pumpkin, the flesh inside is scooped out. An image, usually a monstrous face, is carved out, and the lid replaced.

.

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ICC T20 World Cup 2012 Cricket Tournament Schedule


The inaugural match between Zimbabwe and Sri Lanka would take place on September 18, 2012 at Mahinda Rajapaksa International Stadium, Hambantota. The tournament would conclude on October 7, with the finals played at the Premdasa Stadium, Colombo.

The 12 teams that are participating: Sri Lanka (the host), Zimbabwe, Australia, Ireland, Afghanistan, India, South Africa, New Zealand, Bangladesh, West Indies, Pakistan and England.

Click this link to watch live cricket streaming on crictime.com 

Initial Groups Super Eight (S8) Groups
Group A – England, India, Afghanistan
Group B – Australia, West Indies, Ireland
Group C – Sri Lanka, South Africa, Zimbabwe
Group D – Pakistan, New Zealand, Bangladesh
Group 1 – A1, B2, C1, D2
Group 2 – A2, B1, C2, D1

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Date & Time Match Details
Thu Sep 13
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 1st T20
Ireland vs Zimbabwe
Moors Sports Club Ground, Colombo
Thu Sep 13
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 2nd T20
Sri Lanka vs West Indies
Nondescripts Cricket Club, Colombo
Sat Sep 15
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 3rd T20
Afghanistan vs Sri Lanka 
Moors Sports Club Ground, Colombo
Sat Sep 15
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 4th T20
Australia vs New Zealand
Nondescripts Cricket Club, Colombo
Sat Sep 15
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 5th T20
Bangladesh vs Zimbabwe
Colts Cricket Club Ground, Colombo
Sat Sep 15
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 6th T20
India vs Sri Lanka
P Sara Oval, Colombo
Mon Sep 17
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 7th T20
Australia vs England
Nondescripts Cricket Club, Colombo
Mon Sep 17
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 8th T20
Bangladesh vs Ireland
Moors Sports Club Ground, Colombo
Mon Sep 17
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 9th T20
New Zealand vs South Africa
Colts Cricket Club Ground, Colombo
Mon Sep 17
14:00 local | 08:30 GMT
Warm Up : 10th T20
Afghanistan vs West Indies
P Sara Oval, Colombo
Mon Sep 17
14:00 local | 08:30 GMT
Warm Up : 11th T20
India vs Pakistan
R Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Wed Sep 19
09:30 local | 04:00 GMT
Warm Up : 12th T20
England vs Pakistan
P Sara Oval, Colombo
Tue Sep 18

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group C : 1st T20
Sri Lanka vs Zimbabwe
Mahinda Rajapaksa International Stadium, Hambantota
Wed Sep 19

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Group B : 2nd T20
Australia vs Ireland
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Wed Sep 19

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group A : 3rd T20
India vs Afghanistan
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Thu Sep 20

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group C : 4th T20
South Africa vs Zimbabwe
Mahinda Rajapaksa International Stadium, Hambantota
Fri Sep 21

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Group D : 5th T20
New Zealand vs Bangladesh
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Fri Sep 21

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group A : 6th T20
England vs Afghanistan
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Sat Sep 22

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Group C : 7th T20
Sri Lanka vs South Africa
Mahinda Rajapaksa International Stadium, Hambantota
Sat Sep 22

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group B : 8th T20
Australia vs West Indies
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Sun Sep 23

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Group D : 9th T20
New Zealand vs Pakistan
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Sun Sep 23

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group A : 10th T20
England vs India
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Mon Sep 24

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group B : 11th T20
West Indies vs Ireland
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Tue Sep 25

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Group D : 12th T20
Bangladesh vs Pakistan
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Thu Sep 27

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 1 : 13th T20
TBC vs TBC (C1 v D2)
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Thu Sep 27

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 1 : 14th T20
TBC vs TBC (A1 v B2)
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Fri Sep 28

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 2 : 15th T20 – TBC vs TBC (D1 v C2)
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Fri Sep 28

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 2 : 16th T20
TBC vs TBC (B1 v A2)
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Sat Sep 29

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 1 : 17th T20
TBC vs TBC (A1 v D2)
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Sat Sep 29

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 1 : 18th T20
TBC vs TBC (C1 v B2)
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Sun Sep 30

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 2 : 19th T20
TBC vs TBC (B1 v C2)
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Sun Sep 30

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 2 : 20th T20
TBC vs TBC (D1 v A2)
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Mon Oct 1

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 1 : 21st T20 –
TBC vs TBC (B2 v D2)
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Mon Oct 1

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 1 : 22nd T20
TBC vs TBC (A1 v C1)
Pallekele Cricket Stadium, Kandy
Tue Oct 2

15:30 local | 10:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 2 : 23rd T20
TBC vs TBC (B1 v D1)
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Tue Oct 2

19:30 local | 14:00 GMT
Super Eights, Group 2 : 24th T20
TBC vs TBC (A2 v C2)
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Thu Oct 4

19:00 local | 13:30 GMT
1st Semi Final T20
SE Group-1 1 v SE Group-2 2
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Fri Oct 5

19:00 local | 13:30 GMT
2nd Semi Final T20
SE Group-2 1 vS SE Group-1 2
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Sun Oct 7

19:00 local | 13:30 GMT
Final T20 – SF1 WINNERS vs SF2 WINNERS
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
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