Category Archives: Farmers

Mattu Pongal, the Third Day of the Four-day Harvest Festival of South India.


Myself 

By T. V. Antony Raj

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To mark the end of the harvest season, the Tamils in Tamilnadu, Puducherry, Sri Lanka, and Malaysia, celebrate the festival called Pongal (பொங்கல்) or Thai Pongal(தைப்பொங்கல்). The farmers in these regions thank the Sun, the principal energizer that helps to reap a bountiful harvest.

In Tamilnadu and Puducherry,  Pongal is a four-day festival comprising Bhogi Pandigai, Thai Pongal, Maatu Pongal, and Kaanum Pongal. The Pongal festivities begin on the last day of the Tamil month Maargazhi and culminates on the third day of the Tamil month Thai (January 13 to January 16 in the Gregorian calendar).

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Maattu Pongal (Source: happy-2013.blogspot.com)
Maattu Pongal (Source: happy-2013.blogspot.com)

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Cattle are important and are a form of wealth to people living in rural areas all over the world.

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Nandieshvara

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In Hinduism, the bull Nandi is the mount (Vahana), attendant (gana) of the god  Shiva, and also the gatekeeper-deity of Kailashagiri, the abode of Shiva. According to a legend linked to Mattu Pongal, Shiva sent Nandi from the heavens to earth to deliver his message to the people on earth that they should have an oil bath every day and eat once a month. Nandi inadvertently advised delivered the message that people should take an oil bath once a month and eat every day. When Shiva came to know of his message related to food delivered wrongly, he was annoyed and in a fit of rage, banished Nandi to earth to live permanently among the farmers and help them to produce the extra food crops needed for the people to eat every day.

The rural folks in Tamilnadu and the Tamils in Sri Lanka dedicate the third day of the four-day-long Pongal festivities to their cattle and call it Maattu Pongal (மாட்டுப் பொங்கல்).  Though the name Maattu Pongal seems specific to Tamil Nadu, it is also celebrated in other southern states such as Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka.

According to the Gregorian calendar, Maattu Pongal is celebrated on January 15, the second day of the Tamil month Thai ((தை ).   

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Maattu Pongal (Source - tamilrasigan.wordpress.com)

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The rural folk show their affection towards their cattle by applying kungumam (kumkum) on their cattle’s foreheads and garlanding them. They then feed their cattle with a mixture of venn pongal (sweetened rice), jaggery, banana, sugar cane and other fruits.

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The sport of Jallikkattu (bull embracing)

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Youths trying to tame a bull at a jallikattu held at Idaiyathur, near Ponnamaravathy, in Pudukottai district, Tamilnadu, India (Source - thehindu.com)
Youths trying to tame a bull at a Jallikattu held at Idaiyathur, near Ponnamaravathy, in Pudukottai district, Tamilnadu, India (Source – thehindu.com)

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In many parts of Tamilnadu, the youths take part in the adventurous ancient sport of Jallikkattu (or sallikattu), also known as Manju virattu (chasing the bull), and eru thazhuvatal (bull embracing) to celebrate Mattu Pongal.

Proof of Jallikattu, as an ancient sport of Tamil Nadu, has been corroborated from rock paintings of ‘bull chasing sport’ discovered on massive rock surfaces at Karikkiyur in Nilgiris in Tamil Nadu, which are dated between 2,000 B.C. and 1,500 B.C.

Initially, and were a mild form of sport in the in the southern part of Tamil Nadu, particularly in Madurai, Tiruchirapalli and Tanjavur.

The sport was held in the afternoon or evening of the Mattu Pongal day. After worshipping and feeding the bulls in the morning, their owners tied money in the form of coins or notes on the horns of the bulls and let them loose among the crowd. Young boys chased and lassoed the bulls to retrieve the money tied to their horns.

Nayak dynasties emerged after the fall of the Vijayanagara Empire. During the Nayak rule in Tamil Nadu, this traditional harmless bull-chasing sport transformed into the present form of Jallikattu, which is a bloodier bull-wrestling sport.

Nowadays, ferocious Bos indicus or Bos taurus indicus bulls, also known as indicine cattle or humped cattle, characterised by a fatty hump on their shoulders such as the Pulikulam or Kangayam breeds are selected, trained, and released into a crowd of people. The youngsters to exhibit their valour endeavour to subjugate the bulls by attempting to grab the large hump on the bull’s back with both arms and hang on to it attempting to bring the bull to a stop while it tries to escape. Participants who hold the hump for a long period are declared winners.

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Thai Pongal, the Second Day of the Four-day Harvest Festival of South India.


Myself 

By T. V. Antony Raj

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Happy Pongal

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In Tamil, the word Pongal means “overflowing”, signifying abundance and prosperity. The Tamils in TamilnaduPuducherry, Sri Lanka, and Malaysia, celebrate the festival called Pongal (பொங்கல்) or Thai Pongal (தைப்பொங்கல்). This festival marks the end of the harvest season. The farmers thank the Sun, the principal energizer that helps to reap a bountiful harvest. 

In Tamilnadu and PuducherryPongal is a four-day festival. It begins on the last day of the Tamil month Maargazhi (மார்கழி ) and culminates on the third day of the Tamil month Thai ((தை ) – January 13 to January 16 in the Gregorian calendar.

In Tamil, the phrase “Thai Pirandhal Vazhi Pirakkum” meaning “the birth of Thai heralds new prospects” is an oft-quoted popular saying among the Tamils. 

The four days of Pongal are Bhogi Pandigai, Thai Pongal, Maattu Pongal, and Kaanum Pongal.

Of the four-days Harvest festival, the second day is the principal day of the festival. This day is known as Thai Pongal by the Tamils and they celebrate it on January 14, the first day of the month of (தை). 

All the states in India celebrate this day which coincides with Makara Sankranthi, a winter harvest festival. On this day the Sun begins its six-month-long journey northwards or the UttarayanamThis also represents the Indic solstice when the sun enters Makara (Capricorn), the 10th house of the Indian zodiac.

In Tamil Nadu, Puducherry, Sri Lanka and Malaysia it is celebrated as Thai Pongal.

In Andhra Pradesh, Bengal, Bihar, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Manipur, Orissa, and Uttar Pradesh, this day is is celebrated as Makara Sankranthi.

Gujarathis and Rajasthanis celebrate it as Uttarayana.

In HaryanaHimachal Pradesh and Punjab it is celebrated as Lohri.

Assamese celebrated it as Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu.

Nepaesel celebrate it as Maghe Sankranti or Makar Sankranti.

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Thai Pongal - Boiling milk

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In Tamilnadu, it is a tradition for the housewives to boil milk at dawn in a new clay pot. When the milk boils and spills over the vessel, the folk blow the (a conch) yell “Pongalo Pongal!  The Tamils consider watching the milk boil and spill over as auspicious as it connotes “good luck and prosperity.

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Chakkarai Pongal

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Later, the women prepare Pongal by boiling rice with fresh milk and jaggery in new clay pots. When the rice is half-cooked, sugar, ghee, cashew nuts and raisins are added to the pot. This traditional preparation of sweet rice or Chakkarai Pongal derives its name from the festival.

Newly cooked rice is first offered to the Sun at sunrise as gratitude for a bountiful harvest. Women prepare savouries and sweets such as vadai, murukku, payasam, etc., which they share with their neighbours.

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The Pathetic State of Haryana Farmers


Myself . By T.V. Antony Raj

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In 2011, Haryana farmers suffered damage to their crops, mainly wheat, due to water logging after the heavy rains.

Waterlogged wheat fields
Waterlogged wheat fields

The state government then had ordered a special survey to assess the losses. In April this year, almost two years after the survey, several farmers received cheques as compensation from the Jhajjar district administration in Haryana.

Here is a million rupees question for you: “How much do you expect an average farmer would have received as compensation for damage to his crop?

If you answer ₹2, then you have hit the bull’s-eye.

The Haryana government has issued cheques worth ₹2, ₹3, ₹4 and so on to farmers as compensation for crop damaged during 2011 rains. However, some farmers were lucky and received compensation in double figures of  ₹30 – ₹31.

Haryana farmer Satyanaraian, son of Hari Singh, received an Axis bank cheque of ₹2 and another farmer Tek Chand, son of Bhim Singh, received a cheque for ₹3 as compensation for crops damaged.

Image of a cheque the Haryana government sent to Jhajjar farmers as compensation.
Image of a cheque the Haryana government sent to Jhajjar farmers as compensation.

“We were shocked. We first thought that there had been a mistake, however, we checked with the tahsildar and he confirmed that the amounts on the cheques were correct. The banks are situated in Jhajjar and the bus fare to get there is Rs 14,” said Satyanaraian.

The frustrated farmers have refused to deposit these chques in Axis Bank since they would first have to open an account in the bank that would cost them more money.

A farmer of Paharipur village, owner of 2.5 acres of land asked: “if the government claims that the compensation rate is Rs. 3,500, how did the officials calculate my loss
aa ₹6?”

When the local Indian National Lok Dal (INLD) leaders wanted photocopies of the cheques, the concerned farmers gave them the cheques claiming that even photocopies would cost them.

INLD, the principal opposition party in Haryana has criticized the Bhupinder Singh Hooda-led Congress government for making a mockery of flood relief compensation. On the otherhand, government officials said they deserve a pat on the back for precisely identifying every shareholder and awarding due compensation.

It is alleged that the frustrated farmers have refused to deposit these chques in Axis Bank since they would first have to open an account in the bank that would cost them more money.

A farmer of Paharipur village, owner of 2.5 acres of land asked: “if the government claims that the compensation rate is ₹3,500, how did the officials calculate my loss aa ₹6?”

Indian National Lok Dal (INLD), the principal opposition party in Haryana has criticized the Bhupinder Singh Hooda-led Congress government for making a mockery of flood relief compensation. Abhay Chautala , MLA, Indian National Lok Dal said: “Haryana’s Congress government has ridiculed the poor farmers by issuing these cheques. This is a cruel joke on farmers who lost their valuable crops.”

On the otherhand, government officials said they deserve a pat on the back for precisely identifying every shareholder and awarding due compensation. According to an official spokesperson, ₹1.14 crore has been distributed to farmers in 3,365 acres of land in Jhajjar district.

Bhupinder Singh Hooda, Chief Minister of Haryana
Bhupinder Singh Hooda, Chief Minister of Haryana

However, Chief Minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda defended the government’s move, saying that there was no wrong doing in the compensation provided to farmers.

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