She Drank Blood …


Myself . By T.V. Antony Raj

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A female vampire

Note: This image is for illustration only.

Coimbatore, India
February 26, 2013

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The Coimbatore Medical College and Hospital (CMCH) in Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, India admitted a 28-year-old woman for allegedly drinking blood of stray dogs and chicken which she killed herself.

According to the report filed at the Annur police station the woman the wife of a daily wage laborer from Rajasthan was mentally afflicted recently. The couple resides at Maniakarampalayam in Coimbatore and have two children: a four-year-old daughter and a four-month-old infant.

Friday last week, she tried to drown her four-month-old infant by immersing the child in a water tub at home, but fortunately neighbors saved the child and phoned her husband. A few minutes after the husband arrived, the woman tried to strangle her four-year-old daughter ranting incessantly, “I want blood! I want blood!”

The following day, she killed a stray dog that loitered near her house and drank its blood. Even then her thirst for blood was not assuaged. She sucked the blood from the carcasses of two chickens which she killed by biting off their heads one by one. On witnessing this horrendous act, her husband took her to the Annur Government Hospital. There too she kept on ranting: “I want blood! I want blood!”

The doctors at the Annur Government Hospital referred the woman to the CMCH for psychiatric treatment.

Dr. P. Sivaprakasam, resident medical officer at CMCH said they are treating her for ‘dissociation’, a mental ailment that occurs due to severe trauma over a period of time. In this woman’s case, her alcoholic husband ill-treated her. “This woman was venting her suppressed emotions,” the doctor added.

After reading the above news in the papers a neighbor asked me, “can humans drink fresh animal blood?”

I do not have an answer for this query. However, I found that the Maasai (sometimes spelled “Masai” or “Masaai”), a Nilotic ethnic group of semi-nomadic people in Kenya and northern Tanzania, and the Surma tribe residing in South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia believe drinking fresh blood drawn from living cows makes the body stronger and warmer and good for children and the elderly to build up their strength. These tribes follow the traditional ceremonies of gathering blood from cows zealously.

The men puncture the jugular vein of the cow by shooting an arrow at close range. They collect the blood in gourd vessels and drink it neat or after diluting it with milk. They do not allow the animals to bleed but carefully tend them until the wound heals fully.

Outsiders are normally not allowed to witness these rites.

WARNING: If you have a weak heart please do not see this video as well as the videos cited under ‘RELATED VIDEOS.’

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Coriander Leaves and Kidneys


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Myself . By T.V. Antony Raj

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Kidney2

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The pair of bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a fist, are vital organs in our body located, one on each side of the spine, near the middle of our back, just below the rib cage. The kidneys perform many functions to keep our blood clean and chemically balanced.

Our body uses food for energy and maintenance. Wastes in the blood come from food that we consume and from the normal breakdown of active tissues, such as muscles. Every day, a person’s kidneys process about 200 quarts of blood and filter out about 2 quarts of waste products and removes excess water. The wastes and excess water flows to the bladder through two tubes called ureters as urine. The bladder stores urine until releasing it through urination.

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum), also called cilantro, koththamalli (in Tamil),  or dhania (in Hindi) is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. In the English-speaking world (except for the U.S.) the leaves and seeds are known as coriander. In American culinary usage the leaves are generally referred to by the Spanish word cilantro.

Coriander is an excellent source of minerals like calcium, potassium, manganese, iron, and magnesium. It is also rich in many vital vitamins essential for optimum health including vitamin-A, beta carotene, vitamin-C and folic-acid. By the way, vitamin-C is a powerful natural antioxidant.

A study found both the coriander leaves and seed act as antioxidants, however, the leaves were found to have a stronger effect. Hence, Coriander like many other spices, can delay or prevent spoilage of food seasoned with this spice. Chemicals derived from coriander leaves were found to have antibacterial activity against Salmonella choleraesuis, caused in part by these chemicals acting as nonionic surfactants.

Coriander seeds are used in traditional Indian medicine as a diuretic (a substance or drug that tends to increase the discharge of urine) by boiling equal amounts of coriander seeds and cumin seeds, then cooling and consuming the resulting liquid.

The powerful anti-inflammatory capacities of coriander can help one deal with symptoms of arthritis.

Coriander also increases HDL cholesterol (the good) and reduces LDL cholesterol (the bad).

Cholesterol – the good and the bad

Cholesterol is not all bad. It is an essential fat. In fact, it provides stability in every cell of our body. The liver makes some cholesterol and some comes from diet. Cholesterol cannot dissolve in blood, so transport proteins called lipoproteins carry it to locations where it needs to go.

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 

The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol particles are less dense than other kinds of cholesterol particles. Each microscopic blob of LDL cholesterol consists of an outer rim of lipoprotein surrounding a cholesterol center.

What Makes LDL Cholesterol Bad? It is just its chemical makeup. Here’s how high amounts of LDL cholesterol leads to plaque growth and atherosclerosis.

  • Some LDL cholesterol circulating through the bloodstream tends to deposit in the walls of arteries. This process starts as early as childhood or adolescence.
  • White blood cells swallow and try to digest the LDL, possibly in an attempt to protect the blood vessels. In the process, the white blood cells convert the LDL to a toxic (oxidized) form.
  • More white blood cells and other cells migrate to the area, creating steady low-grade inflammation in the artery wall.
  • Over time, more LDL cholesterol and cells collect in the area. The ongoing process creates a bump in the artery wall called a plaque – made of cholesterol, cells, and debris.
  • The process tends to continue, growing the plaque and slowly blocking the artery.

An even greater danger than slow blockage is a sudden rupture of the surface of the plaque. A blood clot can form on the ruptured area, causing a heart attack.

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol

The High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol particle is dense compared to other types of cholesterol particles. Each microscopic blob of HDL cholesterol consists of a rim of lipoprotein surrounding a cholesterol center.

The well-behaved HDL cholesterol is a friendly scavenger that cruises the bloodstream. It removes harmful bad cholesterol from where it doesn’t belong. High HDL levels reduce the risk for heart disease — but low LDL levels increase the risk.

Experts believe HDL cholesterol may act in a variety of helpful ways that tend to reduce the risk for heart disease:

  • HDL cholesterol scavengers and removes LDL cholesterol.
  • HDL reduces, reuses, and recycles LDL cholesterol by transporting it to the liver where it is reprocessed.
  • HDL cholesterol acts as a maintenance crew for the inner walls of blood vessels (endothelium). Damage to the endothelium is the first step in the process of atherosclerosis, which causes heart attacks and strokes. HDL chemically scrubs the endothelium clean and keeps it healthy.

Coriander leaves offer great relief from stomach indigestion problems and the like. It also helps reduce feelings of nausea. Since it has strong antioxidant properties, it helps promote healthy liver function.

A friend suggested that consuming an infusion of Coriander leaves is a good remedy for kidney pain. This is the instruction my friend gave me to prepare a decoction using coriander leaves:

“Wash and clean a bunch of fresh coriander leaves thoroughly in water to remove the dirt and any residual harmful pesticides that might be sticking on them. Chop the leaves as small as possible. Put the chopped leaves in a vessel, pour filtered water and boil for 10 minutes. Filter after cooling using a sieve. Pour the filtered liquid into a sterilized glass bottle and store it in a refrigerator.”

She said: “Drink one glass of the liquid daily and you will notice all salt and other accumulated poison coming out of your system while passing urine. Also, you will notice that you feel healthier than before.

By the way, coriander can produce an allergic reaction in some people. So, please consult your physician before consuming the coriander decoction.

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